Things I Didn’t Know about Estrogen…

Things I didn't know about estrogen

Although fertility is an issue for so many women facing breast cancer, it has never really been a problem for myself or my husband. We decided a long time ago that we did not want to have children, and we’re still content with that decision.

Too, if a hysterectomy and anti-estrogen therapy just removed my ability to have periods, I’d be totally fine with that. My periods have always been horrid, and cancer treatment has brought me great relief in this part of my daily life.

But as I get deeper into my anti-estrogen treatment and think about scheduling my hysterectomy, I realize just how important estrogen is to our bodies.

Now, I realize that menopause is a natural occurrence in a woman’s life, but chemical menopause is something else entirely. There is no natural transition over a decade or so into a crone. Chemical/surgical menopause is instantaneous and harsh, affecting every part of a woman’s health and lifestyle.

And all too often, breast cancer patients who face this are much too young to even be in peri-menopause, much less the beginning stages of menopause itself.

And no, HRT is not an option. Some people that hear about my being treated with Anastrozole mistakenly believe that this drug is a form of HRT and thus “balances” my hormones to relieve the symptoms of menopause.

Actually, the opposite is the case. The drugs that I take further decrease any remaining estrogen in my system after a hysterectomy, or as in my current state, in conjunction with Zoladex, which shuts down my ovary function and allows me to take the Anastrozole.

So what have I discovered about estrogen now that it’s gone from my body?

(Or at least being chemically suppressed.)


It’s important for eyesight. Even with my fairly new prescription for bifocals, I am increasingly having difficulty reading, which is one of my favorite pastimes. Books almost have to be loaded on to an e-reader so that I can adjust the print size, and even a large print Bible is too much of a strain on my eyes at this point. This has been a surprising and really disheartening side effect of this treatment.


There are increased problems with insomnia. Stress is obviously part and parcel with cancer treatment, and this can most certainly contribute to an inability to sleep. But when hormones suddenly drop, as with the Zoladex–and eventually a hysterectomy–along with the Anastrozole, it becomes more and more difficult to sleep.


It’s important for memory. Although the linked article seems to have a mixed view on the topic, the significant part in the language seems to be that the combination of chemotherapy and anti-estrogen therapy produces a worse result cognitively. (At least that’s how I’m reading the medical jargon.) Too, I have to wonder how many of these women in the studies are truly post-menopausal or have had it induced so that they can take the anti-estrogen therapy.

I am hoping that more research delves into the experiences of younger women with chemically/surgically-induced menopause who are taking anti-estrogen therapy. You can find comments about Anastrozole and similar therapies from women on The Underbelly’s Facebook page.

I struggle now to complete even simple tasks, and my ability to think creatively and to write has been significantly impaired. Recalling even simple words or memories can be extremely difficult for me now. That “it’s on the tip of my tongue” sort of feeling is a constant, everyday thing. I seriously wonder if I will ever be able to function normally in a workplace setting while taking these drugs.


It’s important for bones. Honestly, I already knew this, but I suppose I wasn’t aware how significant a part anti-estrogen therapy can be in the weakening of bones, thus putting even young women at a high risk for osteoporosis and broken bones. As a part of this, of course, another side effect of Anastrozole is bone pain.


It’s important for your heart. And unlike the information in the linked article, HRT is not an option to deal with this particular side effect.


It’s important for weight control. There is also the additional problem that anti-estrogen therapies often cause weight gain, whether through the effects of the drug itself or the lack of desire to exercise due to the constant muscle and joint pain.


I’m sure I’m missing more of estrogen’s effects throughout our bodies, but you get the idea.

(Just wandering through my virtual home at the moment, scratching my head and wondering why I came into the kitchen. And when someone says something to me, I say, “Eh? What’s that sonny?”)

Although menopause in your 50’s and 60’s may be natural, that experienced by younger breast cancer patients is not. The side effects of the surgery and treatments are severe and long lasting. And pervasive.

I suppose if you are still healthy and enjoy the effects of estrogen in your body, my advice would be something akin to that of Robert Herrick, in his poem, “To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time”:

Gather ye rosebuds while ye may,
Old Time is still a-flying;
And this same flower that smiles today
Tomorrow will be dying.

 

2 thoughts on “Things I Didn’t Know about Estrogen…

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s