PTEN and Feminine Issues?

PTEN and Feminine Issues

So the hysterectomy happened…

I have had many surgeries during my lifetime, but I can unequivocally say that this was the most painful one so far. I spent a couple of nights in the hospital and have been recuperating since then.

Although I could discuss the emotional impact of the surgery, I am honestly still trying to figure that out at this point. So I’ll stick with just the facts for now.

When my gynecologist reviewed the pathology report, she stated that she had never seen reproductive organs that were so diseased and covered in tumors. All of it was benign, but it was everywhere. Considering the extent of the problems, she said that this would explain the extreme pain and heavy bleeding that I experienced each month.

Here’s just a sampling from the pathology report:

  • Endometrial polyp, benign
  • Benign inactive indeterminate pattern endometrium
  • Leiomyomata
  • Adenomyosis, florid
  • Endometriosis and fibrous adhesions
  • Ovary with a benign mucinous cystadenoma, endometriosis, and serosal fibrous adhesions
  • Fallopian tube with serosal endometriosis

It goes on and on, but that should give you an idea of what they found. If you’re having trouble wrapping your head around all of those terms–like I was, to be frank–I was told that the disease and tumors were so extensive that my uterus could no longer function as a muscle, that it was simply a sponge. And that was only one part of the entire problem!

I have had painful and heavy periods my entire life, and at no time did any of my regular exams find anything. When I would try to explain my issues with a gynecologist, I was dismissed, with the doctor saying that my reproductive system was “healthy” and I was most likely exaggerating.

Too, after my first cancer diagnosis, I had difficulty finding a gynecologist who wanted to treat someone with a history of breast cancer at a young age. But that’s a whole ‘nother problem in itself.

So the question at this point is this…is all of this related to Cowden Syndrome? I did find this article that references gynecologic problems related to the PTEN mutation, but it only mentions uterine fibroids.

Hopefully further research on the PTEN mutation will shed more light on its gynecological impact.

For those women who have been diagnosed with Cowden Syndrome, however, it may be advisable to push your doctor for more tests than the regular yearly exams, especially if you are having serious issues with your periods. It is certainly possible that all of the disease found on the path report was unique to me alone. But I would hate for another woman to go through 30+ years of awful monthly visits from “Aunt Flo” before they discovered the problems with their reproductive system.

When it comes to rare disease, I guess the final lesson is to take charge of your healthcare and make sure you are getting the treatment you need.

 

Adventures of the Flat and Infertile

adventures of the flat

My next step in treatment is about to commence. Yes, the dreaded hysterectomy has been scheduled for next week.

Nothing like sitting in the waiting room of a gynecologist’s office to make you feel a bit conspicuous. Childless, flat, and there to schedule a hysterectomy.

When I met with the doctor and had my initial exam, I was somewhat surprised to find out that I wouldn’t be able to have a┬álaparoscopic hysterectomy due to my size, fair skin, and lack of childbearing.

Who knew that being a petite, redheaded woman with breast cancer and no history of childbirth would be a drawback when it came to this surgery?

I will be undergoing a full abdominal hysterectomy, with the one large incision on my abdomen. The average hospital stay is about two days, with recovery about six weeks.

Honestly, I’m dreading this surgery, but I’m ready to have it done. At least this will eliminate the Zoladex from my current medication regimen. Although it doesn’t cause me any side effects, I will no longer have to go in for the monthly injection of the implant.

Too, as a patient with Cowden Syndrome, I’ll be eliminating one more possible risk in having this surgery done on a prophylactic basis, way ahead of any cancer developing. As I’ve already had my thyroid and breasts removed, I suppose I’ll doing pretty well as far as future risks are concerned.

And frankly, I’m pretty sick of cancer at this point. I’ll do what I can to avoid any further encounters with the beast.

I’ll be offline for a bit so that I can get things prepared in real life and psyche myself up for this next round in the surgical suite.

See you soon!